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Berwick-upon-Tweed Cityscape

Berwick-upon-Tweed, sometimes known as Berwick-on-Tweed or simply Berwick, is a town and civil parish in Northumberland, England. Located 2.5 mi (4 km) south of the Anglo-Scottish border, it is the northernmost town in England. The town is situated at the mouth of the River Tweed on the east coast, approximately 56 mi (90 km) east-southeast of Edinburgh, 65 mi (105 km) north of Newcastle upon Tyne, and 345 mi (555 km) north of London. Uniquely for England, the town is located slightly further north than Denmark's capital Copenhagen and the southern tip of Sweden further east of the North Sea, which Berwick borders. Berwick was founded as an Anglo-Saxon settlement during the time of the Kingdom of Northumbria, which was annexed by England in the 10th century. A civil parish and town council were formed in 2008 comprising the communities of Berwick, Spittal and Tweedmouth. It is the northernmost civil parish in England. The area was for more than 400 years central to historic border wars between the Kingdoms of England and Scotland, and several times possession of Berwick changed hands between the two kingdoms. The last time it changed hands was when Richard of Gloucester retook it for England in 1482. To this day, many Berwickers feel a close affinity to Scotland. Berwick remains a traditional market town and also has some notable architectural features, in particular its medieval town walls, its Georgian Town Hall and its Elizabethan ramparts.

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Berwick-upon-Tw...

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Berwick-upon-Tweed Cityscape

Berwick-upon-Tweed, sometimes known as Berwick-on-Tweed or simply Berwick, is a town and civil parish in Northumberland, England. Located 2.5 mi (4 km) south of the Anglo-Scottish border, it is the northernmost town in England. The town is situated at the mouth of the River Tweed on the east coast, approximately 56 mi (90 km) east-southeast of Edinburgh, 65 mi (105 km) north of Newcastle upon Tyne, and 345 mi (555 km) north of London. Uniquely for England, the town is located slightly further north than Denmark's capital Copenhagen and the southern tip of Sweden further east of the North Sea, which Berwick borders. Berwick was founded as an Anglo-Saxon settlement during the time of the Kingdom of Northumbria, which was annexed by England in the 10th century. A civil parish and town council were formed in 2008 comprising the communities of Berwick, Spittal and Tweedmouth. It is the northernmost civil parish in England. The area was for more than 400 years central to historic border wars between the Kingdoms of England and Scotland, and several times possession of Berwick changed hands between the two kingdoms. The last time it changed hands was when Richard of Gloucester retook it for England in 1482. To this day, many Berwickers feel a close affinity to Scotland. Berwick remains a traditional market town and also has some notable architectural features, in particular its medieval town walls, its Georgian Town Hall and its Elizabethan ramparts.

Image dimensions: 8368 x 5000 pixels

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